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Toyota Landcruiser petrol FJ series repair manual 1968-1982 NEW

The Toyota Land Cruiser is a series of four-wheel drive vehicles produced by the Japanese car maker Toyota. The Land Cruiser series is the longest running series in Toyota history.

Production regarding the first generation Land Cruiser began in 1951 (90 products) as Toyota's form of a Jeep-like vehicle. The Land Cruiser provides been produced in hardtop, convertible, station wagon, and energy vehicle versions. The Land Cruiser's reliability and sustainability has led to huge popularity, particularly in South Sudan and Australia where it is the best-selling body-on-frame, four-wheel drive vehicle. Toyota also extensively tests the Land Cruiser in the Australian outback considered to be one of the toughest working environments in both temperature and terrain. Principal rivals consist of the number Rover, Land Rover Discovery, Jeep Wrangler, Mitsubishi Pajero and Nissan Patrol. In Japan, the Land Cruiser is exclusive to Toyota Japanese dealerships called Toyota Store.

When running two wheels simultaneously the wheels must be allowed to rotate at various rates whilst the vehicle goes around figure. This is accomplished with a differential. A differential allows one input shaft (e.g., the driveshaft of a vehicle or truck) to drive two output shafts (e.g. - axle shafts that go from the differential to the wheel) independently with different speeds. The differential distributes torque (angular force) uniformly, while releasing angular velocity (turning speed) in a way that the average for the two output shafts is equal to that of the differential ring gear. Each powered axle requires a differential to distribute power between the remaining and correct sides. When all four wheels are driven, third or 'center' differential can be made use of to distribute power between the front and rear end axles.

The described system handles quite well, as it is able to accommodate various forces of movement and distribute power evenly and smoothly, making slippage unlikely. Once it does slip, but, recovery is difficult. If the left front wheel of a 4WD automobile slips on an icy patch of road, for instance, the slipping wheel will spin faster than the other wheels due to the lower traction at that wheel. Since a differential applies equal torque to each power, half-shaft is reduced at the other wheels, even if these people have actually good traction. This problem can occur in both 2WD and 4WD cars, anytime a driven wheel is positioned on a surface area with small traction or raised off the ground. The simplistic design works acceptably well for 2WD vehicles. It is much less acceptable for 4WD vehicles, because 4WD vehicles have twice as many wheels with which to lose traction, increasing the probability that it may happen. 4WD vehicles can also be more likely to drive on surfaces with reduced traction. However, since torque is divided amongst four rims rather than two, each wheel receives approximately half the torque of a 2WD vehicle, reducing the prospective for wheel slip.

In 1941 the Imperial Japanese Army occupied the Philippines, where these people found an old Bantam Mk II jeep, and promptly delivered it to Japan. The Japanese armed forces authorities commanded Toyota to make a similar vehicle but to not model the appearance on the American Jeep. The prototype was called the Model AK and was previously adopted by The Japanese Imperial Army as the Yon-Shiki Kogata Kamotsu-Sha type 4 compact cargo-truck).

Later in 1941 the Japanese government asked Toyota to produce a light truck for the Japan military campaign. Toyota developed a ½-ton prototype known as the AK10 in 1942. The AK10 was built using reverse-engineering from the Bantam GP. The truck featured an upright front grille, flat front wheel arches that angled down and back like the headlights, FJ40 mounted above the wheel arches on either area of this radiator, and a folding windshield.

The AK10 utilized the 2259 cc, 4-cylinder Type C motor from the Toyota Model AE sedan with a three-speed manual transmission and two-speed transfer gearbox hooked up to it. There is actually no mechanical relationship between the AK10 and the postwar Toyota "Jeep" BJ. Most of the AK10's were not positively used (unlike the U.S. Jeep) and there are almost no photographs from it in the battlefield.

The Toyota J40 is the product identification for a Toyota Land Cruiser 40 series made from 1960 until 1984 (in Brazil, where it was referred to as the Toyota Bandeirante, it was made from 1958 until 2001). Most 40 collection Land Cruisers were built as two-door vehicles with slightly larger dimensions than a Jeep CJ.

The model was available as the FJ40 series (with F engines) and also BJ40/41/42 (small wheelbase), BJ43/44/46 (heart wheelbase) or HJ45/47 (long wheelbase) designation exactly where it had a Diesel engine. The Land Cruisers constructed in Brazil from 1958 to 1962 received the series code FJ25 (topless) and FJ25L (soft leading) but are typically called to as FJ-251, and in 1961 thanks to a brand new motor referred to as 2F - not to be confounded utilizing the later 2F engine from 1975 - there still came out some few units with the collection code FJ-151L (soft top). With the product name changed to Bandeirante after 1961, those created from 1962 to 1993 - with Mercedes-Benz engines - got OJ50/55 series and those created from 1994 to 2001 - with Toyota engines - BJ50/55 series model codes.

References to the series in this article is to the J40 series unless referring to one of the petrol (FJ40/42 2WD) or diesel (BJ4#/HJ4#) models specifically.

For the history of the J series from the original 1951 Toyota Jeep BJ with the J20 series see Land Cruiser History from 1950 to 1955.

1960: J40 series launched (wheelbase 2,285 mm (90 in)/2,430 mm (96 in)/2,650 mm (104 in)).

1963: Longer wheelbase (2,950 mm (116 in)), cab-chassis, FJ45-B and pickup were added).

1967: End of four-door FJ45V (I) (w/b 2,650 mm (104 in)) creation, replaced by FJ55 Station wagon).

2-door FJ45-B renamed FJ45 (II) (w/b 2,950 mm (116 in)).

1973?: HJ45 launched with the 3.6-litre, H inline 6-cylinder diesel engine.

1974: BJ40/43 established with the B, 3.0-litre inline 4-cylinder diesel engine. A factory-fitted roll club gets standard in the United States.

1975: Rear ambulance doors are added to US design FJ40s. The lift entrance remains available as an option in other countries.

1976: Disc brakes on the front axle.

1977: Front door vent vent, windows, removed windows on the tough top in the United States

1979: Power steering (just F models) and air conditioning included with the gear, options ratios modified from 4:10 to 3:70 within the United States to be more freeway friendly

1980: HJ47 launched with a 4.0-liter six-cylinder diesel engine. End of HJ45 production.

BJ42/46 and BJ45 launched with a 3.4-liter four-cylinder diesel engine.

1981: Power steering added on the BJ models to the disk, possibilities brakes added in Australia.

1984: End of J40 series production (changed by J70 series).

1993: Five-speed transmission becomes available for the Toyota Bandeirante.

1994: In Brazil, the Mercedes-Benz OM-364 engine is replaced by the Toyota 14B unit.

2001: conclusion of Bandeirante production.

The J40/41/42 was a two-door short wheelbase four-wheel-drive vehicle, with either a gentle or a hardtop (V). It was available with various diesel or petrol (from 1974) engines over its lifetime. Information technology was replaced of all markets from 1984 by the J70 series (70/71).

The FJ42 is 4X2 design, for just the Middle East.

The J43/J44/46 was an extremely rare two-door method wheelbase four-wheel-drive vehicle, with either soft or hard-top (V). It was replaced on the majority of markets from 1984 by the J70 series (73/74).

The J45/47 was a long-wheelbase four-wheel-drive vehicle, available in two-door hardtop, three-door hardtop, four-door station wagon and two-door pickup designs. The four-door place wagon model (FJ45V-I) was the shortest-lived of the J40 series, as it was replaced because of the FJ55G/V in 1967.

The Bandeirante TB25/TB41/TB51 Series are J2 collection built in Brazil by Toyota do Brasil Ltda from 1962 to 1966/68. In 1966 they were replaced by the OJ32 (soft top) and OJ31 (hard top) for the TB25, and the TB81 for any TB51; for an unknown reason the TB41 would keep its J2 code until 1968 when Toyota do Brasil switched out of the J2 on the J3 series in 1966.

The Bandeirante OJ40/OJ45 Series (1968 to 1973), OJ50/OJ55 Series (1973 to 1994) and BJ50/BJ55 Series (1994 to 2001) are J4 series built in Brazil by Toyota perform Brasil Ltda from 1968 to 2001. Identical to the BJ40 in almost every respect, it had a few stylistic changes to the grille (models produced from 1989 on featured square headlights, instead of the round ones used before) and used Mercedes-Benz OM-314/OM-324/OM-364 diesel engines (replaced by Toyota 14B inline 4 direct injection Diesel engine in 1994) for much of its production life; another visible mayor distinctive are the entire hind doors (like at Land Rover) other than the standard Toyota two-wing hind doors at the Bandeirante's hard top models.

1959:

FJ25 - Short open (topless) bushdrive car - motor Toyota F (May 1959 to 1960/61) - new in 1959 (also described as FJ251)

1960/1961:

FJ25L - Short soft top bushdrive car - engine Toyota F (1960/1961 to 1960/1961) - new in 1960/1961 (also described as FJ251L)

FJ151L - Short comfortable top bushdrive car - motor Toyota 2F (1960/1961 to December 1961) - replaces the the FJ25/FJ251 and FJ25L/FJ251L (there tend to be few mentions in literature and no preserved unit known; it might be even doubted if it's ever been actually built.

1962:

TB25L - Quick gentle top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (January 1962 to - 1966? - before August 1968) - changes the FJ151L (or FJ25L/FJ251L?)

TB25L - Quick hard top bushdrive car - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (January 1962 to - 1966? - before August 1968) - brand new in 1962

TB41L - Long hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1962 to July 1968) - brand new in 1962

TB51L - Short pickup with native bed - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1962 to January 1966)

1965:

TB51L3 - Short 3-door double cabin pickup with native steel and sleep bed cover - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (? < 1965 < ?) - new in 1965; possibly there may have been built one unit only

1966? (between 1962 and 1968):

OJ32L - Short soft top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (before August 1968 - 1966? - to August 1968) - replaces the soft top TB25L

OJ31L - Short hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (before August 1968 - 1966? - to August 1968) - replaces the hard top TB25L

TB81L - Short pickup with native bed - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (February 1966 to August 1968) - replaces the TB51L

1968:

OJ40L - Quick soft top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1968 to January/February 1973) - changes the OJ32L

OJ40LV - Short hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (October 1968 to January/February 1973) - replaces the OJ31L

OJ40LV-B - Long hard leading bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (October 1968 to January/February 1973) - changes the TB41L

OJ45LP-B - Short pickup with local bed - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-324 (September 1968 to January/February 1973) - replaces the TB81L

1973:

OJ50L - Short soft top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (February 1973 to November 1989) - replaces the OJ40L

OJ50LV - Short hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (February 1973 to November 1989) - replaces the OJ40LV

OJ50LV-B - Long hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (February 1973 to November 1989) - replaces the OJ40LV-B

OJ55LP-B - Short pickup with native bed - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (February 1973 to November 1989) - replaces the OJ45LP-B

between 1973 and 1989:

OJ55LP-B3 - Short chassis-cab collection - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (19?? to November 1989) - new in 19??

OJ55LP-BL - Long pickup with native bed - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (19?? to November 1989) - new in 19??

OJ55LP-BL3 - Short chassis-cab pickup - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (19?? to November 1989) - new in 19??

OJ55LP-2BL - Long 2-door double cabin pickup with native bed - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-314 (19?? to November 1989) - new in 19??

1989:

OJ50L - Short soft leading bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to April 1994) - changes the OJ50L with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ50LV - Short hard top bushdrive car - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - changes the OJ50LV with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ50LV-B - Long hard top bushdrive auto - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ50LV-B with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ55LP-B - Short pickup with native sleep - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ55LP-B with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ55LP-B3 - Quick chassis-cab pickup - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ55LP-B3 with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 engine

OJ55LP-BL - Long pickup with native sleep - motor Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ55LP-BL with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ55LP-BL3 - Long chassis-cab collection - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ55LP-BL3 with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

OJ55LP-2BL - Long 2-door double cabin collection with native bed - engine Mercedes-Benz OM-364 (November 1989 to Abril 1994) - replaces the OJ55LP-2BL with Mercedes-Benz OM-314 motor

1994:

BJ50L - Short smooth very top bushdrive car - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - changes the OJ50L

BJ50LV - Short hard top bushdrive car - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ50LV

BJ50LV-B - Long hard top bushdrive car - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ50LV-B

BJ55LP-B - Short pickup with local bed - engine Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ55LP-B

BJ55LP-B3 - Short chassis-cab pickup - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ55LP-B3

BJ55LP-BL - very long pickup with native bed - engine Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ55LP-BL

BJ55LP-BL3 - Long chassis-cab pickup - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ55LP-BL3

BJ55LP-2BL - Long 2-door double cabin pickup with local bed - motor Toyota 14B - April 1994 to November 2001 - replaces the OJ55LP-2BL

1999:

BJ55LP-2BL4 - Long 2-door double cabin collection with native bed - motor Toyota 14B - 1999 to November 2001 - brand-new in 1999

Over the years Toyota has changed the engines used in the J40 series. The B series motor is a 4-cylinder diesel, in addition to H series a 6-cylinder diesel. The diesel-engined trucks were never sold for the general public in the USA, though some found their way in as mine trucks. The machines are similar, within the series. For example, the F and 2F engines share many of the same parts. However the H and 2H engines have almost absolutely nothing in common. There are specific versions within the engine series, for example, there's an F125 engine, and an F155 engine, all into the F series with different power rankings.

While not legal in some countries, most J40 series vehicles could have their roof and doorways taken out. With a folding windshield this allowed for total open-air experience.

The J40 Series also highlighted folding jump seats behind the passenger and operators seats. These folding seats not only made carrying another 2 passengers conceivable, but also allowed for maximum cargo space, as opposed to the folding rear seat in the Jeep CJ series.

Original factory winches were driven right from the move case (known as P.T.O. or power take off) powered through the engine. Later models had an optional electrical winch.

There is a good sized following of individuals that collect, maintain, and drive their J-series truck off road. Toyota still offers numerous replacement parts, available through Toyota parts departments worldwide. Many of these trucks find their house in places with severe road conditions as work trucks, exactly where they are used each day by their owners. Its essence resides on in the J70 series, which is essentially a J40 with an updated front half and slightly various engine offerings, such as a turbo charged diesel. It sells in a lot of places, but was never for sale in the United States Of America.

For 2006, Toyota introduced the FJ Cruiser, a modern SUV styled following the original FJ40. The FJ Cruiser (FJC) went available for sale in the spring of 2006.

Diesel Toys have actually a popular conversion on the Toyota FJ making use of the Diesel engine from the Toyota Fortuner 4WD, the Toyota 1KD-FTV D4D Diesel Engine it's been a popular conversion for those who want the reduced torque grunt and great fuel economy of a diesel.

Even though its manufacturing ended in Brazil several years ago, the Toyota Bandeirante is still really sought after, because of its good off-road performance. Thus Bandeirantes reach high prices in the Brazilian used car marketplace, especially the rare 1993 models which had been the only types installed with a Mercedes-Benz engine married to a five-speed transmission.




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Toyota Landcruiser Petrol FJ40 FJ43 FJ45 FJ55 series 1968 - 1982 Haynes Repair Manual NEW 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

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